test.wayneswords.com

  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size
Home Anglers Corner
Anglers Corner

catboy

Have you made a recent fishing trip to Lake Powell? If you have, please let us know how you did.  Post your fishing report on the Fishing Message Board or send it to Wayne Gustaveson ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) via E-mail.  Please include who you are and where you are from, dates fished, location, tackle used, species and number of fish caught and any other information you would like to pass on to other anglers.

Our goal here is to save shad by encouraging harvest of striped bass.  If we do that then all fisheries benefit from the effort.

Keep the reports coming.  I send out high resolution pictures to the media with my weekly fish reports.  If you have a good photo and would like it to be displayed in newspapers and magazines then send it to me.   Be aware that your photo may be used in other locations.

If possible send, first and last name, and hometown. The media likes pictures of kids (include age) and fishergirls. Be creative when taking photos. Change poses and backgrounds. Use the flash in full sun to avoid hat shadow.

Thanks to all who have contributed because it makes it easier for a newly arriving angler to start fishing with confidence needed to catch fish on this huge lake.

If you have a general question try posting on WAYNESWORDS FISHING MESSSAGE BOARD.



September 29, 2014 - Rock Creek Smallmouth

E-mail Print PDF

I spent a great week camping near Rock Creek.  Was able to find smallies at most every stop along the bank.  Most fish were in the 1 to 1.5 Lb. range, and 15 to 25 ‘ deep.   Stripers were tough!  I have never seen so many shad groups at or near the surface.  I guess they were too well fed to try my lures. I would stumble into a short boil once in a while, and able to get 1 or two on top and same for a jig, fishing under the last boil location.  Great fun and missed the bad weather the weekend of the 26th!!

I think your site is one of the best in the country for up to date information!

 

Steve Anderson

 

September 29, 2014 - Gunsight bass and boil

E-mail Print PDF

Arrived at Lake Powell Wednesday afternoon, got the houseboat squared away and headed towards Antelope Cayon to look for Boils. No success. On Thursday morning took the Houseboat to Gunsight. Headed out in the evening to hunt for boils again no luck. Friday Morning Got up early to look for Boils in Gunsight still no luck. Fished some of the coves in gunsight and found some willing Smallmouth.

Friday night went over to Warm Creek to look for boils no such Luck. Saturday Morning woke up to some rain and wind. Snuck out a couple of times in between storms and found more willing Smallmouth.

Saturday Afternoon while fishing for Smallmouth finally found what we had been looking for a Boil! It was in the Mouth of Gunsight on the west side along the Sandy Beaches. They came up about 4 times over an hour. They would stay up long enough to get one well placed cast. We were able to boat about 12 fish before we were blown off the lake.

The fish were young and very healthy, shaped more like footballs. Had we spent more time fishing for smallmouth we probably would have caught a lot more fish. But the temptation of finding a boil was too great. The Smallmouth were in great shape as well. Most were taken on DT Hula grub in Chartreuse or a Shad Jerkbait. Sunday we we took the houseboat in. We did not see any boils on the way in.

 

September 28, 2014 - San Juan

E-mail Print PDF

 

mm14sj1Here are some pictures from Paul Prathers group I took fishing on the San

Juan on Monday the 22nd. We arrived at our spot about 6:15 in the morning

and caught a few smallmouth bass but we wanted stripers. Within a few

minutes they started hitting the surface here and there. We used top water

poppers and caught one or two. Then they started hitting the surface in

small groups and caught several more.


We chased them around and around the cove we were in and when they weren't hitting top water we dropped spoons down in the school and caught them that way. We missed a few but brought home 17 really fat nice stripers. It was a lot of fun.  

 

Our biggest one was a 5.4#er. They fought really hard and they were really healthy, healthier than I've seen them in years!!! They stayed up until around 8:30 then we used the spoons and trolled a little then lost the school. We caught a bunch of smallies and headed back to the houseboat. We had a great time with a great bunch of guys!


mm14sj2Good fishing to all!

Mike McNabb

 

September 25, 2014 - Cedar

E-mail Print PDF
Camped in Cedar and fished North again from 9/20 to 24. If you enjoy chasing surface feeding Stripers, mile marker 129, use techniques aforementioned on WWs, best times for me were 3:00 to sunset. Caught 2-4 nice LMB (2-4 lbs) each morning this week on small Ghost Sammy during early morning (from when you can just see to when the sun hits the water. Water temp. 77-78. Great weather for bobbing around by the houseboat. Sleeping temp is perfect.
 

September 22, 2014- Halls Night fishing

E-mail Print PDF
Sept 19 and 20 -
Thanks for your efforts with your website.  I refer to it frequently throughout the year, as we
fish from the boat during pleasant weather and from the Halls Crossing Marina during the
winter months.  Striper is a staple at our table, and we take walleye and cats whenever we
catch them, along with bluegill and crappy.  We live in Blanding, UT about 90 miles from
Halls Crossing.
We fished over Labor Day weekend with fair success.  We fished at Halls Crossing marina
at night and caught 15 or 20 stripers between 3 of us.  We caught mostly catfish and sunfish
during the days.  The action was about the same with anchovies or worms for stripers, and
plastic baits were good for sunfish or bluegill and a few smallmouth bass during the day.  We
didn't catch a single largemouth.  We watched a shad ball work back and forth near the shore
in a cove, and saw smallmouth bass following them about 5 yards off.
Last Friday evening we launched the boat just before dark, and after asking everyone we saw
coming out about fishing results and hearing that they hardly caught anything, we decided to
tie off at the Halls Crossing marina and fish under the lights.  Between 3 of us we caught 20
stripers in a few hours, average size was 3 pounds or so.  The biggest was about 5 pounds and
quite fat.  Half of the longer ones were quite thin, and barely had strength to stay upright after
a fight while reeling them in.  They made pretty skimpy fillets.  The best were 2 to 3 pounds,
very well fed and good fighters.  We fished in some of our favorite spots Saturday afternoon and
didn't get a bite.  Things are different with so many shad around.  The full moon was a week
or so before that, which may have been another factor in the slower results.  We are glad we
fished at night under the lights and came home with 13 to 15 lbs of fillets.
Here is a photo of our daughter Sophia, 11, in front of part of our catch of stripers
at Halls Crossing about 10:45 PM.  She is really good at setting the hook and hauling in the fish,
and has patience to stay with it while we figure out the depth and bait to use for the stripers.  She
will outfish almost any boy around, just by sheer energy and focus.  We hooked most of these fish
at about 60' down, with anchovies on 1/4 oz. leadheads.  I also saw and hooked a few fat ones just
under the deck, that were lurking around waiting for a chance to gobble up an unsuspecting little
fish.
Here is my recipe for what we ate yesterday and really enjoyed:
2 or 3 lbs striper filets, cubed 3/4 to 1"
1/3 large onion, chopped
1 garlic clove chopped fine
1 jonagold apple fresh from the tree, diced
1 medium red jalapeno from the garden, chopped
natural rock salt to taste
grapeseed oil to sautee everything in
I started by sauteeing the onion, garlic, apple and jalapeno until it was softening a little,
then added the cubed striper and the first salting.  I covered the cast iron pan and let it
all simmer around 30 minutes, stirring gently a couple of times to turn the striper over,
then took the lid off and tasted it and added some salt, and simmered another 10 minutes
uncovered.  Four of us ate all we wanted with brown rice and steamed cabbage, and con-
cluded it was the tastiest striper meal we ever had.  We will definitely try a similar recipe
again.
Thanks again for the wealth of information and hints we glean from your website.
Ralph Redd

Sept 19 and 20 -

Thanks for your efforts with your website.  I refer to it frequently throughout the year, as wefish from the boat during pleasant weather and from the Halls Crossing Marina during thewinter months.  Striper is a staple at our table, and we take walleye and cats whenever wecatch them, along with bluegill and crappy.  We live in Blanding, UT about 90 miles fromHalls Crossing. We fished over Labor Day weekend with fair success.  We fished at Halls Crossing marinaat night and caught 15 or 20 stripers between 3 of us.  We caught mostly catfish and sunfishduring the days.  The action was about the same with anchovies or worms for stripers, andplastic baits were good for sunfish or bluegill and a few smallmouth bass during the day.  We didn't catch a single largemouth.  We watched a shad ball work back and forth near the shore in a cove, and saw smallmouth bass following them about 5 yards off. 

Last Friday evening we launched the boat just before dark, and after asking everyone we sawcoming out about fishing results and hearing that they hardly caught anything, we decided totie off at the Halls Crossing marina and fish under the lights.  Between 3 of us we caught 20 stripers in a few hours, average size was 3 pounds or so.  The biggest was about 5 pounds andquite fat.  Half of the longer ones were quite thin, and barely had strength to stay upright aftera fight while reeling them in.  They made pretty skimpy fillets.  The best were 2 to 3 pounds,very well fed and good fighters.  We fished in some of our favorite spots Saturday afternoon anddidn't get a bite.  Things are different with so many shad around.  The full moon was a weekor so before that, which may have been another factor in the slower results.  We are glad we fished at night under the lights and came home with 13 to 15 lbs of fillets.


rreedHere is a photo of our daughter Sophia, 11, in front of part of our catch of stripersat Halls Crossing about 10:45 PM.  She is really good at setting the hook and hauling in the fish,and has patience to stay with it while we figure out the depth and bait to use for the stripers.  She will outfish almost any boy around, just by sheer energy and focus.  We hooked most of these fish at about 60' down, with anchovies on 1/4 oz. leadheads.  I also saw and hooked a few fat ones justunder the deck, that were lurking around waiting for a chance to gobble up an unsuspecting little fish. 

 

Here is my recipe for what we ate yesterday and really enjoyed: 

2 or 3 lbs striper filets, cubed 3/4 to 1"1/3 large onion,

chopped1 garlic clove chopped fine

1 jonagold apple fresh from the tree,

diced

1 medium red jalapeno from the garden,

chopped natural rock salt to taste

grapeseed oil to sautee everything in 

I started by sauteeing the onion, garlic, apple and jalapeno until it was softening a little, then added the cubed striper and the first salting.  I covered the cast iron pan and let itall simmer around 30 minutes, stirring gently a couple of times to turn the striper over, then took the lid off and tasted it and added some salt, and simmered another 10 minutes uncovered.  Four of us ate all we wanted with brown rice and steamed cabbage, and concluded it was the tastiest striper meal we ever had.  We will definitely try a similar recipe again. 

Thanks again for the wealth of information and hints we glean from your website.  

Ralph Redd

 

Warm Creek Mother Lode and Trip Report - STRIPERHOLIC

E-mail Print PDF

Warm Creek Mother Lode and trip report.

Got back from a five day catchin trip to the lower end. I fished solo on Thursday and Friday, and Hotwheels and Stan the man showed up on Saturday.
We put the h.b. on a beach to the west side of Antelope Island just outside of the mouth of Warm Creek.

Stripers on Thursday were more than willing to chomp on a storm jointed deep diver in steel shad color just out side the west tire line at APM. Workers over
there told me boils were every where Wednesday night. I got there Thursday afternoon about 4:30 p.m. and trolled up 14 sassy fighters in about an hour. Kept waiting for boils to appear
and they didn't! Cruised back over to Warm Creek and the water was glass. Could see schools of shad on top shimmering all over the bay in the middle
between the cut entrance and the channel entrance. Had high hopes, but did not see one splash or any top water action. Went back to the h.b to fillet.

Friday morning cruised up to Gun Sight to try to catch the boils out front. Nothing showed so I went into Gun Sight, and got into some single splash top water
action. Got a couple on top, and trolled a few up. Saw a school on the graph that was prime for jiggin, and started catching them on the 1st drop of a slab spoon.
This school was on the move, and I had to work hard to stay on top of them! Best technique was slap jiggin in front of their face. They wouldn't touch a speed reeled spoon,
and some of them were hitting the spoon on the drop. Must watch line closely for that! Lost that school and trolled around for a while with no action. Cruised over to Navajo
and was hoping to find a good school to jig. Spent quite awhile in there, and didn't find any schools at all so trolled out using a glass ghost colored deep husky jerk and was able to
pick up a half dozen that way. Went back to hb to fillet and rest up for the evening. Headed out in the afternoon into Warm Creek, I know there is a school somewhere out there!
Spent a lot of time all over Warm Creek and didn't find them, and no top water action either. Salvaged the afternoon with a run over to APM, and picked up a few more trolling.
Came back to some nice purple sunsets.

Saturday morning I wanted to stay close so cruised over to APM, and while I was trolling they started to boil outside of the west tire line, took me awhile to get to them as I was on
the inside of the tire line, and of course it is no wake zone. I was able to pick up a couple on top before they went down and never showed again. Tried trolling again but they were not taking anything.
Went back over to warm creek and graphed around and looked for some top water action! Nothing! Persistence in Warm Creek will pay off sooner or later I will just be patient!
Cruised back to the hb to wait for Hotwheels to get there.

After Hotwheels showed up we took the h.b out to the mouth of Warm Creek and got into a nasty storm while trying to anchor it. Big time wind, lighting, and some rain. Big
rolling waves about 3 feet high, and lasted for about an hour. Did not even go out to fish that evening.
Got up early Sunday morning and went to Gun Sight for the boils that Wayne promised were there! Yeah right! Anyway went into Gun Sight after no boils appeared,
and found the jigging school to work over. We got quite a few fish out of that school before they disappeared. Saw Kevin Campbell up there with some clients and they were jigging up
another school farther out towards the mouth! Cruised over to say high, but kept my distance because he had paying customers!

We headed to Last Chance to find Kurt's school, and were not disappointed. Kurt don't bother going up there we fished it out except for the pod of smb! hehe
Trolled up some nice lunkers out of there and picked up some nice smb also. After that slowed down I went and explore a bunch of more canyons in last chance, but found
nothing exciting! Went back to the hb, filleted fish and had our traditional fish fry that night.
Monday did the mouth of Gun Sight for the boils--nada, and headed back up to get the rest of the Stripers out of Kurt's hole!
Hotwheels worked the south side and I worked the north side! Back bay I found a big school of something so stopped and dropped a spoon, and bent pole--what it was a smb!
Then a striper, then a smb. What the heck, mixed bag. The smb bass I caught were so fat and deep that they were starting to look like crappie! Decided to troll around in there and started catching
big fat smb, and an occasional striper! I caught 15 really nice smb, and if I wanted to do some lazy drop shotting routine I bet that I would have caught 50 smb. Nope ain't gonna do that!
Can't stand drop shot fishing, I like setting the hook like a real man!
Finished up there and headed back to Warm Creek. Jack was trolling and I was trolling/graphing to try and find the school that I knew was there. Jack and Stan caught a couple, and I had a really nice
e one on that came unbuttoned at the boat! Was the best fish of the trip for me but he decided that he didn't want to be table fare! I waved good bye to him. We headed back to the h.b. to fillet and have steaks!

Tuesday morning we decided to stay close and just fish for a couple of hours before pulling up anchors and leaving. We were out graphing, and Hotwheels spotted a boil over along the east shore about
1/3 miles south of the hay stacks! By the time we got there it was down, and no fish below. Went back to trolling/graphing. Then another boil started along the shore line same area and the stripers
were busting shad right on the shore line. I got there in time to get one out of that and Hotwheels and crew had some good hits but no hookups. Went back out a ways from the shoreline to wait for
up them to come again but there was just a few small groups chasing shad on top all around us! We could not get to them. Next thing I know I look over at Jack's boat and I saw him sitting still with two poles bent over!
I moved over there and Jack was over a huge school jiggin them up! As soon as I got beside I dropped a slab, and my line started gathering on top, so closed the bail and bam it was on.
This is what my graph looked like, and I figure about a thousand or more fish in the school!



I floated for about 50 feet and the graph still looked the same. Poles were bending over left and right with stripers laying all over both decks of our boats, then they would disappear. We would take off graphing in different directions
and then I found them again. Yelled at Jack that I found them and he would come over by me and the whole process would start all over again! I knew the mother lode would be in here, and the was just like 2 years ago when we
were hauling them up every day in Warm Creek.

Here is a pic of the master jigger himself and Stan while over the school.



We repeated this process 2 more times, having to graph each time they moved. Man what a blast! There are many different techniques of jigging and speed reeling is one, because you are still vertical fishing for them!
Don't be afraid to try all of them when vertical fishing! Speed reeling would work, but most of the time they were picking the spoon up on the initial drop! Then you would have to slap jig in front of their noses! Quite a few times
I let it drop to the bottom and the use a swift lift, and would get violent hits that way. Another technique is to drop to the bottom, speed reel a few turns and slap jig, then speed reel and slap jig! All of these were working
on this school! We finally lost them, but that was ok, as we had a couple of coolers of fish to clean, and then pull anchors and head back to the buoy! What a great end to a trip. I will be back in a couple of weeks!
Tight lines!
Last Updated on Friday, 26 September 2014 09:26
 

September 22, 2014- Gunsight Bass

E-mail Print PDF
Two things  became abundantly clear during our fishing trip last week. First, Lake Powell’s smallmouths are still in their late summer patterns and, second, they are getting plenty to eat. All this makes them a bit tougher to catch than normal for mid-September.
My fishing partner for this trip was once again longtime friend John Conrad from Prescott. John has always enjoyed fishing trips with unique challenges, and this trip was not a disappointment in that regard. While we managed to catch a lot of fish, they did not come easily. The time honored principles of location and presentation were once again critical to our success.
Since good weather was predicted for Tuesday, we decided to make the run to Last Chance Bay where I have had outstanding success for the past several years. We fished the coves that were usually good during this time of the year, but it was clear the large numbers of game fish had not yet moved back into them. We lost a couple very nice smallmouths and landed a few smaller ones, but the action was not what we expected. We moved out to the main lake points and reefs below Gregory Butte and managed to find a few fish, but the action was not what we expect for Powell this time of year. Most of the fish we caught were in 17-20 feet of water. I graphed quite a few deeper fish, but they were not active. It was obvious the fish were not chasing lures. We had to present our baits right in front of their noses. We finished Tuesday with 26 smallmouths, one largemouth and a couple sunfish. While this sounds like a pretty good day, many of our fish were small - certainly not up to mid-September Lake Powell standards. We did look for stripers but only saw a few scattered boils. We did stop to fish one on the way up, but the fish had gone down by the time we arrived at the area. A number of casts with topwater lures and spoons produced nothing. I did graph what I thought to be some striper schools and several times dropped a spoon into them, however all I caught doing this was one little smallmouth.
With the prediction for afternoon thunderstorms and our lack of big success uptake, we decided that for Wednesday we would stay closer to home. Noting the lack of fish in the backs of the coves and canyons, we decided to concentrate on main lake structure and motored to the reefs on the east side of the mouth of Gunsight. I remembered having good success here in past years at similar water levels and felt it would be a good place to try. It turned out to be a good call. We were into fish immediately and maintained consistent catching all day. There is no doubt in my mind that the partial overcast helped as the fish were much more active than Tuesday. The best depths were 17-23 feet and the best presentations were either straight down vertical below the boat and short underhand pitches paralleling the reef edges. All the fish we caught were near but not always right on the edges of the reefs. Although most of our fish were caught at the before mentioned depths, we did pull a few from underneath shallow overhanging ledges. Wednesday’s tally consisted of 51 smallmouths, two catfish and one nice bluegill.
The afternoon thunderstorms predicted for Wednesday failed to appear and neither did the rain that was predicted for Thursday. In fact, Thursday dawned bright and clear with hardly a cloud in the sky. Both John and I feared it would make the fishing tougher, but we were confident we had figured out the pattern and would do fairly well. We decided to go back to the mouth of Gunsight. I caught two decent smallmouths right off the bat, but it soon became apparent that yesterday’s pattern was not holding up. We tried some reefs on the opposite side of the channel but only caught a couple little ones there. It was around 10:00 a.m. when John suggested we move down to the ledges around the mouth of Navajo Canyon. Making that move saved our day. We started slowly catching about five fish over the first hour or so; however around 11:30 a.m. the action really picked up, and we were soon catching fish one after another - often scoring doubles. Whether it was the smallmouths finally turning on or our finally figuring out the pattern or a combination of both, I don’t know. But over the next  two and a half hours we put 32 bass in the boat after struggling so hard early. We found the bass much tighter to the structure than the day before and much deeper - 25-35 feet and even down to 40. This again was classic drop shot fishing by dropping our lures directly below the boat or making short pitches parallel to the ledges. Longer horizontal casts were generally not effective. Many hits came on the initial drop, but it paid to keep the lure down there for at least a minute or so. We found that the less action we tried to impart on our lures, the better - again classic drop shotting.
Our Thursday totals were 42 smallmouths, one little largemouth, one catfish and one sunfish. I wonder how many fish we would have caught had we stumbled onto this pattern early on, however we were happy to have figured it out when we did.
Every fish taken but one was on a drop shot setup. John caught most of his fish on a Berkley Gulp minnow in a natural shad type color. I used the Yamamoto Shad Shaped Worm which has been the top Lake Powell smallmouth producer for several years. I used natural shad and darker green colors. I also had good luck on the watermelon/cream white laminate. Quite frankly, I don’t believe lure choice or color was all that important. What was important was getting the lure in front of the fish as it did not seem they were willing to chase a bait too far. Although we did not catch any really big bass - our biggest was a little under two pounds - the smallmouths we caught were in excellent condition. They had the widest girths for their lengths of any smallmouths I’ve ever seen on Lake Powell. While I found a few shad in the stomachs of the fish we filleted, most of our fish were literally stuffed full of crayfish. There appears to be a bumper crop of crayfish this year, and it does not appear the bass have to extend a lot of effort to catch them. I believe this explains why we had to get our lures right in front of them.
As mentioned earlier, it is clear the smallmouths and other gamefish had not yet begun to move into their fall patterns. Water temperatures ranged from 77 to 79 degrees which is a bit high for this time of year. I believe we need to see daytime highs drop about 10 degrees and water temperatures move down into the lower 70s before we will see significant pattern changes. Hopefully that will have happened by the time I return September 29. If it doesn’t, however, I know where I will start looking.
Two things  became abundantly clear during our fishing trip last week. First, Lake Powell’s smallmouths are still in their late summer patterns and, second, they are getting plenty to eat. All this makes them a bit tougher to catch than normal for mid-September.

My fishing partner for this trip was once again longtime friend John Conrad from Prescott. John has always enjoyed fishing trips with unique challenges, and this trip was not a disappointment in that regard. While we managed to catch a lot of fish, they did not come easily. The time honored principles of location and presentation were once again critical to our success.

Since good weather was predicted for Tuesday, we decided to make the run to Last Chance Bay where I have had outstanding success for the past several years. We fished the coves that were usually good during this time of the year, but it was clear the large numbers of game fish had not yet moved back into them. We lost a couple very nice smallmouths and landed a few smaller ones, but the action was not what we expected. We moved out to the main lake points and reefs below Gregory Butte and managed to find a few fish, but the action was not what we expect for Powell this time of year. Most of the fish we caught were in 17-20 feet of water. I graphed quite a few deeper fish, but they were not active. It was obvious the fish were not chasing lures. We had to present our baits right in front of their noses. We finished Tuesday with 26 smallmouths, one largemouth and a couple sunfish. While this sounds like a pretty good day, many of our fish were small - certainly not up to mid-September Lake Powell standards. We did look for stripers but only saw a few scattered boils. We did stop to fish one on the way up, but the fish had gone down by the time we arrived at the area. A number of casts with topwater lures and spoons produced nothing. I did graph what I thought to be some striper schools and several times dropped a spoon into them, however all I caught doing this was one little smallmouth.

With the prediction for afternoon thunderstorms and our lack of big success uptake, we decided that for Wednesday we would stay closer to home. Noting the lack of fish in the backs of the coves and canyons, we decided to concentrate on main lake structure and motored to the reefs on the east side of the mouth of Gunsight. I remembered having good success here in past years at similar water levels and felt it would be a good place to try. It turned out to be a good call. We were into fish immediately and maintained consistent catching all day. There is no doubt in my mind that the partial overcast helped as the fish were much more active than Tuesday. The best depths were 17-23 feet and the best presentations were either straight down vertical below the boat and short underhand pitches paralleling the reef edges. All the fish we caught were near but not always right on the edges of the reefs. Although most of our fish were caught at the before mentioned depths, we did pull a few from underneath shallow overhanging ledges. Wednesday’s tally consisted of 51 smallmouths, two catfish and one nice bluegill.

The afternoon thunderstorms predicted for Wednesday failed to appear and neither did the rain that was predicted for Thursday. In fact, Thursday dawned bright and clear with hardly a cloud in the sky. Both John and I feared it would make the fishing tougher, but we were confident we had figured out the pattern and would do fairly well. We decided to go back to the mouth of Gunsight. I caught two decent smallmouths right off the bat, but it soon became apparent that yesterday’s pattern was not holding up. We tried some reefs on the opposite side of the channel but only caught a couple little ones there. It was around 10:00 a.m. when John suggested we move down to the ledges around the mouth of Navajo Canyon. Making that move saved our day. We started slowly catching about five fish over the first hour or so; however around 11:30 a.m. the action really picked up, and we were soon catching fish one after another - often scoring doubles. Whether it was the smallmouths finally turning on or our finally figuring out the pattern or a combination of both, I don’t know. But over the next  two and a half hours we put 32 bass in the boat after struggling so hard early. We found the bass much tighter to the structure than the day before and much deeper - 25-35 feet and even down to 40. This again was classic drop shot fishing by dropping our lures directly below the boat or making short pitches parallel to the ledges. Longer horizontal casts were generally not effective. Many hits came on the initial drop, but it paid to keep the lure down there for at least a minute or so. We found that the less action we tried to impart on our lures, the better - again classic drop shotting.

Our Thursday totals were 42 smallmouths, one little largemouth, one catfish and one sunfish. I wonder how many fish we would have caught had we stumbled onto this pattern early on, however we were happy to have figured it out when we did. 

Every fish taken but one was on a drop shot setup. John caught most of his fish on a Berkley Gulp minnow in a natural shad type color. I used the Yamamoto Shad Shaped Worm which has been the top Lake Powell smallmouth producer for several years. I used natural shad and darker green colors. I also had good luck on the watermelon/cream white laminate. Quite frankly, I don’t believe lure choice or color was all that important. What was important was getting the lure in front of the fish as it did not seem they were willing to chase a bait too far. Although we did not catch any really big bass - our biggest was a little under two pounds - the smallmouths we caught were in excellent condition. They had the widest girths for their lengths of any smallmouths I’ve ever seen on Lake Powell. While I found a few shad in the stomachs of the fish we filleted, most of our fish were literally stuffed full of crayfish. There appears to be a bumper crop of crayfish this year, and it does not appear the bass have to extend a lot of effort to catch them. I believe this explains why we had to get our lures right in front of them.

As mentioned earlier, it is clear the smallmouths and other gamefish had not yet begun to move into their fall patterns. Water temperatures ranged from 77 to 79 degrees which is a bit high for this time of year. I believe we need to see daytime highs drop about 10 degrees and water temperatures move down into the lower 70s before we will see significant pattern changes. Hopefully that will have happened by the time I return September 29. If it doesn’t, however, I know where I will start looking.
 

September 16, 2014 -Boils at Antelope Canyon

E-mail Print PDF

 

Thanks Wayne for your helpful blog! We used it to help us know how/when/where to fish for stripers, and your info worked great. We caught plenty of fish on 9/14 morning, at mouth of Antelope Canyon, as well as up in the canyon 1/4 mile or so. When we put in at Antelope Point Marina on Saturday evening, there was a huge school of stripers breaking right in the channel. They stayed up for a long time, but were gone by the time we parked and got on our way. We camped in Warm Creek, then drove back to the boat ramp at sunrise, and found stripers boiling all around Antelope Canyon.

 

We caught some smallmouth bass, too, all on Storm plastic shad and Strike King shad crank baits that we bought at Walmart in Page. We didn't see any boils from Warm Creek to the mouth of Antelope Canyon. We were marking a lot of fish in Warm Creek bay at about 30-40 feet on the depthfinder. Thanks again for your helpful advice on your blog! The tip on shallow running lures worked like a charm :)

 

 

 

September 17, 2014 - Boils and Bighorn

E-mail Print PDF
Had an opportunity to fish evenings this weekend. Boils were good in the area out from the mouth of Trachyte: late Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Anglers we camped near told us 2 mile was good Thursday evening but fish were absent Friday. Also that the Trachyte area boiled well on Sunday morning. We saw hardly anything around camp in 4 Mile but were not there while fish boiled up river.
Our search for Desert Bighorns was not as productive. Hiking is good but a little warm still.   Marty Peterson.

Had an opportunity to fish evenings this weekend. Boils were good in the area out from the mouth of Trachyte: late Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Anglers we camped near told us 2 mile was good Thursday evening but fish were absent Friday. Also that the Trachyte area boiled well on Sunday morning. We saw hardly anything around camp in 4 Mile but were not there while fish boiled up river.


Our search for Desert Bighorns was not as productive. Hiking is good but a little warm still.  

Marty Peterson.

 

September 15, 2014 - Last Chance bass and stripers

E-mail Print PDF
It took us a few minutes to mark the first school but when we did, it was game on.
We kept making passes, catching fish trolling, then dropping spoons on the followers, with good success.
Something we did that day was different for me, after a school had left under the boat and we resumed trolling, my daughters boyfriend decided to leave out his spoon,
he was using a brass colored kastmaster with a red insert, he quickly and often caught more than the rest dragging an assortment of shallow running lures.
With 2 lines out, from about 7:30-9:00 we boated over 20 fish, then they disappeared.
We came back the next morning and started trolling with 3 rods out.
The 2 on the outside, running a grappler shad and the famous red Kastmaster, were completely outfished this day by a short running red jointed shad rap, running 50' out in the prop wash.( a tip Mondo gave me a couple years ago)
We caught many doubles and 2 triples and yet only managed to get tangled on 2 occasions.
So we caught close to 40 fish, can't recall what time we started but it was certainly early.
On this day we kept marking schools and catching up to 11:00.
As far as boils, we saw a few, 4-5 fish hitting the surface at times, each time we got in the area and threw spoons and my daughter was using a chartreuse jig head with a Yamamoto single tail, color was white with a silver speckle.
The jig using the Yamamoto grub far out caught the combined efforts of all the spoons, her success only ended after she caught several smallies she sighted in the shallows as we made trolling passes,
the smallies, in the 1-1 1/2 pound range managed to chew off the last Yamamoto tail, other single tails were un effective.
Anyway, we had a great time fishing, caught more than we deserved based on a great tip from a friend.
All stripers were in the 1-1 1/2 pound range as well. I had a little bit larger one to the boat and promptly lost it(in the 2-3lb range.)
We pulled into the back of a small canyon to filet and my daughter wanted to keep trying the jighead.
she hollered to come look and we were treated to a display of constant shad swimming around the boat.
They kept breaking the surface and it looked like rain. No stripers caught here, despite seeing a large school come onto the graph below the shad.(they soon left 

We spent the last few days camped in Kane Wash, Travis was able to get us the much sought after first cove on the right. I had my daughter in from Oklahoma and my nephew came in from SLC for this quick trip.

We set out early Saturday and trolled a couple small Islands just out from camp, no fish caught but several graphed.We quickly headed to the East wall, made a quick trolling pass with no marked fish.

Based on a tip from a super nice guy, we headed over to last chance. Dropped into the 3rd canyon on the right and started trolling, we had out a white and orange rattlin rap and a chrome/black grappler shad.It took us a few minutes to mark the first school but when we did, it was game on.

We kept making passes, catching fish trolling, then dropping spoons on the followers, with good success.
Something we did that day was different for me, after a school had left under the boat and we resumed trolling, my daughters boyfriend decided to leave out his spoon, he was using a brass colored kastmaster with a red insert, he quickly and often caught more than the rest dragging an assortment of shallow running lures.With 2 lines out, from about 7:30-9:00 we boated over 20 fish, then they disappeared.

We came back the next morning and started trolling with 3 rods out. The 2 on the outside, running a grappler shad and the famous red Kastmaster, were completely outfished this day by a short running red jointed shad rap, running 50' out in the prop wash.( a tip Mondo gave me a couple years ago). We caught many doubles and 2 triples and yet only managed to get tangled on 2 occasions.


So we caught close to 40 fish, can't recall what time we started but it was certainly early.
On this day we kept marking schools and catching up to 11:00.


As far as boils, we saw a few, 4-5 fish hitting the surface at times, each time we got in the area and threw spoons and my daughter was using a chartreuse jig head with a Yamamoto single tail, color was white with a silver speckle. 
The jig using the Yamamoto grub far out caught the combined efforts of all the spoons, her success only ended after she caught several smallies she sighted in the shallows as we made trolling passes,
the smallies, in the 1-1 1/2 pound range managed to chew off the last Yamamoto tail, other single tails were un effective.
Anyway, we had a great time fishing, caught more than we deserved based on a great tip from a friend.
All stripers were in the 1-1 1/2 pound range as well. I had a little bit larger one to the boat and promptly lost it(in the 2-3lb range.)


We pulled into the back of a small canyon to filet and my daughter wanted to keep trying the jighead.
she hollered to come look and we were treated to a display of constant shad swimming around the boat.
They kept breaking the surface and it looked like rain. No stripers caught here, despite seeing a large school come onto the graph below the shad.(they soon left)

 
  • «
  •  Start 
  •  Prev 
  •  1 
  •  2 
  •  3 
  •  4 
  •  5 
  •  6 
  •  7 
  •  8 
  •  9 
  •  10 
  •  Next 
  •  End 
  • »


Page 1 of 53

Waynes Words Login