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Water temperature:

78-82 F

September 5, 2019



July 12, 2017 - Summer report

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Lake Powell Fish Report – July 12, 2017
Lake Elevation: 3635
Water Temperature:  79-85 F
By: Wayne Gustaveson http://www.wayneswords.com
Lake Powell has stabilized.  There is plenty of brush along the shoreline so hopefully the lake will continue to cover that for the rest of July before it begins to decline.
Good News!  Received the first report of a boil today near Antelope Point Marina. Stripers were eating shad larger than the tiny shad found the last month. Stripers were scattered but willing to hit a topwater lure occasionally.  It is not really time to come fish for boils but that event is getting closer.  Surface activity should pick up lakewide by the end of July and continue through the month of August, maybe longer.
We had a requirement to collect 60 stripers today to do a disease certification and confirm that Lake Powell fish are still healthy and strong. If I had known the stripers were boiling near Antelope Point I would have gone there for my fish collection.  Early this morning I only knew that bait fishing is still good along the canyon walls. We took 3 boats and headed for Warm Creek Wall. We chummed along the wall and began to catch fish steadily for the next 3 hours. The school would come up for chum and then descend to the depths.  When near the surface many fish were caught in 10-15 feet of water.  When the action died down we dropped out baits further down to 40-60 feet to find the school and drag it back towards the top. Catching slowed down at 9 AM so we counted the fish and confirmed that we had our 60 fish.  Later at the fish cleaning station we counted 80 stripers from the efforts of 10 anglers in 3 different boats. Those fishing Lake Powell for the first time were in awe of the amount of fish that can be caught on this incredible fishing lake.
Bait fishing success will continue to excel this summer as many fish remain “trapped” in the deeper water by warm temperatures on the surface.  The younger stripers will continue to feed on the top and gain weight dramatically as the boil season progresses.
Bass fishing is now getting more predictable as the lake level has stabilized. That allows bass to find a spot they like and hold there until the lake begins to go down next month.  It seems smallmouth bass are often found on a slick rock wall near the flooded brush line.  By next week that preferred habitat type should become obvious and will be reported.
Walleye fishing is slowing but some are still being caught in the mid to upper lake.  Now that shad are larger and more abundant expect walleye to feed each morning and evening.  They prefer to hold on a flat near a steep cliff wall, or in the brushy weeds along a long sandy beach or point that has been covered with water.   Bottom bouncing, or fishing a bass grub with worm attached is still a very effective technique.
It is summer and still HOT! However, Lake Powell is amazing considering the amount of fish that can be caught in these challenging conditions.  Go fishing early. Then enjoy boating, skiing, sightseeing or whatever peaks your interest.  Then as the sun starts to set go out for another fishing adventure. It is definitely worth it.

Lake Powell Fish Report – July 12, 2017

Lake Elevation: 3635

Water Temperature:  79-85 F

By: Wayne Gustaveson http://www.wayneswords.com


nancyLake Powell has stabilized.  There is plenty of brush along the shoreline so hopefully the lake will continue to cover that for the rest of July before it begins to decline. 

Good News!  Received the first report of a boil today near Antelope Point Marina. Stripers were eating shad larger than the tiny shad found the last month. Stripers were scattered but willing to hit a topwater lure occasionally.  It is not really time to come fish for boils but that event is getting closer.  Surface activity should pick up lakewide by the end of July and continue through the month of August, maybe longer. 

We had a requirement to collect 60 stripers today to do a disease certification and confirm that Lake Powell fish are still healthy and strong. If I had known the stripers were boiling near Antelope Point I would have gone there for my fish collection.  Early this morning I only knew that bait fishing is still good along the canyon walls. We took 3 boats and headed for Warm Creek Wall. We chummed along the wall and began to catch fish steadily for the next 3 hours. The school would come up for chum and then descend to the depths.  When near the surface many fish were caught in 10-15 feet of water.  When the action died down we dropped out baits further down to 40-60 feet to find the school and drag it back towards the top. Catching slowed down at 9 AM so we counted the fish and confirmed that we had our 60 fish.  Later at the fish cleaning station we counted 80 stripers from the efforts of 10 anglers in 3 different boats. Those fishing Lake Powell for the first time were in awe of the amount of fish that can be caught on this incredible fishing lake.

doepkestbBait fishing success will continue to excel this summer as many fish remain “trapped” in the deeper water by warm temperatures on the surface.  The younger stripers will continue to feed on the top and gain weight dramatically as the boil season progresses. 

Bass fishing is now getting more predictable as the lake level has stabilized. That allows bass to find a spot they like and hold there until the lake begins to go down next month.  It seems smallmouth bass are often found on a slick rock wall near the flooded brush line.  By next week that preferred habitat type should become obvious and will be reported.  

Walleye fishing is slowing but some are still being caught in the mid to upper lake.  Now that shad are larger and more abundant expect walleye to feed each morning and evening.  They prefer to hold on a flat near a steep cliff wall, or in the brushy weeds along a long sandy beach or point that has been covered with water.   Bottom bouncing, or fishing a bass grub with worm attached is still a very effective technique.  

It is summer and still HOT! However, Lake Powell is amazing considering the amount of fish that can be caught in these challenging conditions.  Go fishing early. Then enjoy boating, skiing, sightseeing or whatever peaks your interest.  Then walleyelurewormas the sun starts to set go out for another fishing adventure. It is definitely worth it.

 

July 5, 2017 - Fishing in Shallow Brush

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Lake Powell Fish Report – July 5, 2017
Lake Elevation: 3635
Water Temperature:  77-84 F
By: Wayne Gustaveson http://www.wayneswords.com
Lake Powell fish are in awe at the brushy cover inundated along the shoreline. Virtually any place that is not a sheer cliff is now a brushy haven for all of Lake Powell’s fish. Those enjoying cover the most are shad. Normally this time of year, defenseless shad are easy targets for stripers and other fish. Now shad can go hide in the brush making it much tougher for predators to get an easy meal. I am happy as well because this gives me hope that shad will grow to a larger size, in larger numbers which will lead to big striper boils in late July and August.  This will be a story for a future report.  Right now shad are happy in brushy cover and game fish are trying to figure out what is going on!
Stripers were thrilled to have slow moving tiny shad in open water where they could just go get an easy meal any time of the day.  Now shad are able to swim and have high-tailed it to the brush line.  Surface feeding action that was easy to see two weeks ago is now missing in action in the southern lake. Striper slurps still continue in the northern lake where shad numbers are higher and muddy water slowed the progression of shad movement to brush.
Warm surface water and lack of open-water shad have made bait fishing in deep water the most effective fishing technique now for stripers. Adult stripers are hungry and trapped down at 30 feet waiting for food. Main channel and main canyon walls anywhere on the lake can house a hungry, waiting school of stripers.  Chumming and bait fishing may be the best way to approach these waiting fish.  Another option is to troll deep diving lures along slick rock points and steep walls.  Trolling is a good way to find a school of fish. Once found, bait may work better but it really depends on which angling technique is preferred.
Smallmouth bass prefer rocky structure but are not afraid of brush. They have followed shad into the underwater jungle and can be found searching through the limbs and branches for a shad or sunfish.  Small topwater lures, swim baits, D-Shad, and weedless plastic baits fished along brushy main points have been very effective.  Watch for shad schools to pop up in the brush line and then toss a surface lure near the shad school to target any game fish also eyeing that school.
Largemouth bass will be right there rubbing shoulders with smallmouth bass. Largemouth tend to prefer brush thickets in shallow water. They live in the same brushy condo as sunfish. Bass are good neighbors most of the time but occasionally eat one of the sunfish when the time is right.  With a full stomach, largemouth return to being model citizens and continue to live in the brush pocket.
Walleye really like brush.  They are an ambush feeder so they move to a submerged tree top and wait for the right fish to swim by.  Walleye are happy to eat shad, sunfish, bass or any other fish that enters their treetop target zone. One great technique for catching walleye in brushy water is to troll or cast a shad imitating lure just over the treetops where walleye are holding.  We caught a walleye on a surface lure last week in a tree top found in murky water. More commonly a lure trolled just over the tops of a band of submerged trees is the best technique. Find trees that are at a common depth, then use a lure that runs about a foot above the brush for best results.
Catfish are really big and fun to catch this year.  Sunfish are in the trees and like to eat worms on a small hook with a bobber attached.
Lake Powell fishing in the brush is unusual and may be challenging for those of us used to snag-free open water.  The rewards are great when a new successful presentation is discovered. Lake Powell has lots of fish to catch. Sometimes trying new challenging techniques, like fishing in shallow brush, can be very rewarding.

Lake Powell Fish Report – July 5, 2017

Lake Elevation: 3635

Water Temperature:  77-84 F

By: Wayne Gustaveson http://www.wayneswords.com


buoy25aLake Powell fish are in awe at the brushy cover inundated along the shoreline. Virtually any place that is not a sheer cliff is now a brushy haven for all of Lake Powell’s fish. Those enjoying cover the most are shad. Normally this time of year, defenseless shad are easy targets for stripers and other fish. Now shad can go hide in the brush making it much tougher for predators to get an easy meal. I am happy as well because this gives me hope that shad will grow to a larger size, in larger numbers which will lead to big striper boils in late July and August.  This will be a story for a future report.  Right now shad are happy in brushy cover and game fish are trying to figure out what is going on! 

Stripers were thrilled to have slow moving tiny shad in open water where they could just go get an easy meal any time of the day.  Now shad are able to swim and have high-tailed it to the brush line.  Surface feeding action that was easy to see two weeks ago is now missing in action in the southern lake. Striper slurps still continue in the northern lake where shad numbers are higher and muddy water slowed the progression of shad movement to brush. 

Warm surface water and lack of open-water shad have made bait fishing in deep water the most effective fishing technique now for stripers. Adult stripers are hungry and trapped down at 30 feet waiting for food. Main channel and main canyon walls anywhere on the lake can house a hungry, waiting school of stripers.  Chumming and bait fishing may be the best way to approach these waiting fish.  Another option is to troll deep diving lures along slick rock points and steep walls.  Trolling is a good way to find a school of fish. Once found, bait may work better but it really depends on which angling technique is preferred. 

Smallmouth bass prefer rocky structure but are not afraid of brush. They have followed shad into the underwater jungle and can be found searching through the limbs and branches for a shad or sunfish.  Small topwater lures, swim baits, D-Shad, and weedless plastic baits fished along brushy main points have been very effective.  Watch for shad schools to pop up in the brush line and then toss a surface lure near the shad school to target any game fish also eyeing that school.  Largemouth bass will be right there rubbing shoulders with smallmouth bass.

bbjorksbLargemouth tend to prefer brush thickets in shallow water. They live in the same brushy condo as sunfish. Bass are good neighbors most of the time but occasionally eat one of the sunfish when the time is right.  With a full stomach, largemouth return to being model citizens and continue to live in the brush pocket.

Walleye really like brush.  They are an ambush feeder so they move to a submerged tree top and wait for the right fish to swim by.  Walleye are happy to eat shad, sunfish, bass or any other fish that enters their treetop target zone. One great technique for catching walleye in brushy water is to troll or cast a shad imitating lure just over the treetops where walleye are holding.  We caught a walleye on a surface lure last week in a tree top found in murky water. More commonly a lure trolled just over the tops of a band of submerged trees is the best technique. Find trees that are at a common depth, then use a lure that runs about a foot above the brush for best results.   

Catfish are really big and fun to catch this year.  Sunfish are in the trees and like to eat worms on a small hook with a bobber attached. Lake Powell fishing in the brush is unusual and may be challenging for those of us used to snag-free open water.  The rewards are great when a new successful presentation is discovered.

Lake Powell has lots of fish to catch. Sometimes trying new challenging techniques, like fishing in shallow brush, can be very rewarding.

 

castlebutte

 

June 28, 2017 - Slurps slipping

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Lake Powell Fish Report – June 28, 2017
Lake Elevation: 3634
Water Temperature:  77-84 F
By: Wayne Gustaveson http://www.wayneswords.com
My weekly striper slurp evaluation trip yesterday was quite interesting?  We started earlier than usual (first light) and I attributed the lack of slurpers at my first stop at the mouth of Labyrinth to timing.  Maybe we were too early?  Then at the east wall in Padre Bay the lack of slurpers was disconcerting.  Timing was right and the most dependable location at the mouth of Last Chance was also disappointing with no surface schools seen.
The mystery was finally solved as we found slurping stripers close to the brushy shoreline between Dove Canyon and Dungeon Canyon. Here is what I think is happening in the southern lake:
The slurping stripers we caught and then examined at the fish cleaning station contained the same size tiny shad as has been noted for the last month. While fishing in the brush I saw schools of larger shad (1 inch to 1.5 inch) using the brush as a defense against attacking stripers and smallmouth bass. Slurping stripers are still looking for the open water newly hatched shad which are less every day.  Baby shad are consumed quickly by hungry predators but a few grow larger by fleeing into the brush cover. Either way they are less available to slurping stripers waiting in open water.
Slurps will continue to a lesser degree until shad grow larger and are forced to move out of the brush into open water in search of more plankton to eat.   The next progression is striper boils which have begun in mid July over the past few years. Expect slurps to occur randomly over the next few weeks.  Stripers will blow up on shad whenever they get the chance. There will be more slurps in the mid to northern lake because there are more shad there that have been protected by poor visibility from the muddy runoff water.
A recent report indicated that slurps are increasing in the main channel from the mouth of Navajo to Antelope Point Marina.  A new shad spawn could also lead to more slurps from Padre Bay to Rainbow Bridge.  Surface fishing for stripers is just beginning and will get much better over the summer.   Bait fishing for adult stripers is still steady in deeper water in the main channel and the main canyons throughout the lake.
Smallmouth bass have gone deeper. Adult bass are now at 25 feet or deeper. Smaller bass are shallower.  Rapidly rising water has displaced many bass. They are following the rising water into the brush in the backs of canyons that are now getting much longer and covering brush that has not been wet for many years.  Largemouth bass are following the rising water and residing in brush thickets in 3 feet of water at the back of canyons and coves..
Walleye are still being caught in good numbers by anglers using bottom bouncing rigs with night crawlers or trolling over brushy flats with shallow running crankbaits. Walleye really like to perch in flooded treetops while waiting for forage fish to swim by. Rattletraps are a good choice now for walleye. We caught a walleye yesterday on a surface lure fished slowly around flooded trees.  That fish now wears tag number 2901.
Summer fishing is a lot of fun. Get out early while it is still cool and fish are active. Look for surface action.  Target the brushy shoreline to catch a wide variety of species. Surface lures are very effective during the calm morning and evening hours.

Lake Powell Fish Report – June 28, 2017

Lake Elevation: 3634

Water Temperature:  77-84 F

By: Wayne Gustaveson http://www.wayneswords.com


My weekly striper slurp evaluation trip yesterday was quite interesting?  We started earlier than usual (first light) and I attributed the lack of slurpers at my first stop at the mouth of Labyrinth to timing.  Maybe we were too early?  Then at the east wall in Padre Bay the lack of slurpers was disconcerting.  Timing was right and the most dependable location at the mouth of Last Chance was also disappointing with no surface schools seen. 

The mystery was finally solved as we found slurping stripers close to the brushy shoreline between Dove Canyon and Dungeon Canyon. Here is what I think is happening in the southern lake:

The slurping stripers we caught and then examined at the fish cleaning station contained the same size tiny shad as has been noted for the last month. While fishing in the brush I saw schools of larger shad (1 inch to 1.5 inch) using the brush as a defense against attacking stripers and smallmouth bass. Slurping stripers are still looking for the open water newly hatched shad which are less every day.  Baby shad are consumed quickly by hungry predators but a few grow larger by fleeing into the brush cover. Either way they are less available to slurping stripers waiting in open water.    

smallshadstbSlurps will continue to a lesser degree until shad grow larger and are forced to move out of the brush into open water in search of more plankton to eat.   The next progression is striper boils which have begun in mid July over the past few years. Expect slurps to occur randomly over the next few weeks.  Stripers will blow up on shad whenever they get the chance. There will be more slurps in the mid to northern lake because there are more shad there that have been protected by poor visibility from the muddy runoff water.

A recent report indicated that slurps are increasing in the main channel from the mouth of Navajo to Antelope Point Marina.  A new shad spawn could also lead to more slurps from Padre Bay to Rainbow Bridge.  Surface fishing for stripers is just beginning and will get much better over the summer.   Bait fishing for adult stripers is still steady in deeper water in the main channel and the main canyons throughout the lake. 

Smallmouth bass have gone deeper. Adult bass are now at 25 feet or deeper. Smaller bass are shallower.  Rapidly rising water has displaced many bass. They are following the rising water into the brush in the backs of canyons that are now getting much longer and covering brush that has not been wet for many years.  Largemouth bass are following the rising water and residing in brush thickets in 3 feet of water at the back of canyons and coves.

waemouth

 

Walleye are still being caught in good numbers by anglers using bottom bouncing rigs with night crawlers or trolling over brushy flats with shallow running crankbaits. Walleye really like to perch in flooded treetops while waiting for forage fish to swim by. Rattletraps are a good choice now for walleye. We caught a walleye yesterday on a surface lure fished slowly around flooded trees.  That fish now wears tag number 2901. 

Summer fishing is a lot of fun. Get out early while it is still cool and fish are active. Look for surface action.  Target the brushy shoreline to catch a wide variety of species. Surface lures are very effective during the calm morning and evening hours.

 

June 21, 2017 - Stripers Still on Top!

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Lake Powell Fish Report – June 21, 2017
Lake Elevation: 3631
Water Temperature:  77-84 F
By: Wayne Gustaveson http://www.wayneswords.com
Stripers Still on Top!
Surface feeding stripers have been reported from Wahweap Bay to Hite.  The slurping schools are still feeding quickly and tend to go up and down often.  My reports indicate that they stay up longer and are caught more often from Dangling Rope to the San Juan and Bullfrog Bay to Good Hope Bay.  Expect to see them anywhere and anytime. Since they are commonly feeding lakewide my goal today was to find out which lures caught the most fish.
My preference is surface casting so I can see the fish hit the top water lure. That way even if there is no hookup I can see the fish and feel the adrenaline spike. I chose the Ima Skimmer because it performed well last week and repeated that performance today. It’s a long thin lure that casts well.
My next rod had the Lucky Craft lipless vibrator (rattletrap type) tied on because the slurps go up and down quickly.  When they are up, just reel it quickly through the splashing fish.  If they go down let the ‘trap sink until it is below the submerged school and then reel it up through the school for a quick hookup.
Stripers are feeding on very small shad so the best lure to “match the hatch” is a small white fly.  It takes a fly rod to cast a fly or an added weight to get the fly out there on a spinning rod.   I tied a small white fly on behind a Kastmaster spoon. My setup was not the best and got only a few bumps without a hookup.  If using flies bring the fly rod.
The best lure of the day was a Yamamoto D Shad (white color 364) on a 5/0 Owner hook with a 3/32 ounce belly weight and a twist lock attachment. This big lure caught the most slurping stripers.  It worked well swimming through the striper school or dropping down a bit when the school went down.
All lures worked but the most important factor was to cast to the right spot. These fast moving fish feed in an erratic pattern. They start in one direction, only to change course, go down and come up in a new direction. It is critical to cast 5 feet or more ahead of the lead fish since the lure will fly for 2-3 seconds and then land near the fast moving school.  If it lands in the sweet spot where the lead fish can see it there will be a hookup.  If it lands behind the lead fish then it is often ignored. The school often stays up for up to 5 minutes or more but once the boat is in range the fish tend to go down after the lures hit the water.  The first cast must be accurate to get a quick hookup.
Today the striper slurps began at first light and quit at 9 AM.  We came in on a hot day instead of waiting for the noon slurps to start.  More slurps are found in the evening .
We did try trolling with deep divers over 25-foot slick rock bottom structure and caught stripers and smallmouth bass.  We talked with bait anglers fishing in the shady coves on the east wall in Last Chance and they were catching lots of adult stripers. Striper fishing is still good despite the heat.
I often tell anglers to fish small isolated white rock slides in the steep walled main channel to catch smallmouth bass. We tested that theory and found the rock slides to be quiet, but if we cast to the slick rock wall on the other side of the rock slide cove we caught a smallmouth bass on every cast.  Smallmouth bass are still active and very catchable. It just takes a bit of experimenting to find their preferred habitat for the day.
Walleye are active early morning and evening and during the day as they hang out under muddy water floating on the surface caused by wind or wake action. Catfish, Bluegill and green sunfish are active now as well but the rising water has not allowed them to find their summer home. That will happen when the lake stabilizes in July.

Lake Powell Fish Report – June 21, 2017

Lake Elevation: 3631

Water Temperature:  77-84 F

By: Wayne Gustaveson http://www.wayneswords.com

Stripers Still on Top!

Surface feeding stripers have been reported from Wahweap Bay to Hite.  The slurping schools are still feeding quickly and tend to go up and down often.  My reports indicate that they stay up longer and are caught more often from Dangling Rope to the San Juan and Bullfrog Bay to Good Hope Bay.  Expect to see them anywhere and anytime.  Since they are commonly feeding lakewide my goal today was to find out which lures caught the most fish.

imabasslure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My preference is surface casting so I can see the fish hit the top water lure. That way even if there is no hookup I can see the fish and feel the adrenaline spike. I chose the Ima Skimmer because it performed well last week and repeated that performance today. It’s a long thin lure that casts well.  

lv100stb

 

My next rod had the Lucky Craft lipless vibrator (rattletrap type) tied on because the slurps go up and down quickly.  When they are up, just reel it quickly through the splashing fish.  If they go down let the ‘trap sink until it is below the submerged school and then reel it up through the school for a quick hookup. 

Stripers are feeding on very small shad so the best lure to “match the hatch” is a small white fly.  It takes a fly rod to cast a fly or an added weight to get the fly out there on a spinning rod.   I tied a small white fly on behind a Kastmaster spoon. My setup was not the best and got only a few bumps without a hookup.  If using flies bring the fly rod.  

kfs-k856

 

The best lure of the day was a Yamamoto D Shad (white color 364) on a 5/0 Owner hook with a 3/32 ounce belly weight and a twist lock attachment. This big lure caught the most slurping stripers.  It worked well swimming through the striper school or dropping down a bit when the school went down.

 slurps622bAll lures worked but the most important factor was to cast to the right spot. These fast moving fish feed in an erratic pattern. They start in one direction, only to change course, go down and come up in a new direction. It is critical to cast 5 feet or more ahead of the lead fish since the lure will fly for 2-3 seconds and then land near the fast moving school.  If it lands in the sweet spot where the lead fish can see it there will be a hookup.  If it lands behind the lead fish then it is often ignored. The school often stays up for up to 5 minutes or more but once the boat is in range the fish tend to go down after the lures hit the water.  The first cast must be accurate to get a quick hookup. 

Today the striper slurps began at first light and quit at 9 AM.  We came in on a hot day instead of waiting for the noon slurps to start.  More slurps are found in the evening .   

 

 

 

 

 

 

We did try trolling with deep divers over 25-foot slick rock bottom structure and caught stripers and smallmouth bass.  We talked with bait anglers fishing in the shady coves on the east wall in Last Chance and they were catching lots of adult stripers. Striper fishing is still good despite the heat.

 

 

codyson2

 

I often tell anglers to fish small isolated white rock slides in the steep walled main channel to catch smallmouth bass. We tested that theory and found the rock slides to be quiet, but if we cast to the slick rock wall on the other side of the rock slide cove we caught a smallmouth bass on every cast.  Smallmouth bass are still active and very catchable. It just takes a bit of experimenting to find their preferred habitat for the day. 

Walleye are active early morning and evening and during the day as they hang out under muddy water floating on the surface caused by wind or wake action. Catfish, Bluegill and green sunfish are active now as well but the rising water has not allowed them to find their summer home. That will happen when the lake stabilizes in July.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 21 June 2017 08:40
 

June 14, 2017 - Slurping Stripers on Top!

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Lake Powell Fish Report – June 14, 2017
Lake Elevation: 3626.58
Water Temperature: 69 - 78 F
By: Wayne Gustaveson http://www.wayneswords.com
Stripers on Top!
In the last report I mentioned that stripers would soon feed on the surface. We now have confirmation!  Stripers are slurping lakewide.  The recent w**dy days kept stripers down as the waves crashed against the shore and messed up surface visibility where young shad swim.  This morning it was finally calm and stripers were on top early and baby shad were being consumed by the millions. The twenty stripers I caught this morning averaged about 50 shad per stomach (average length .75 inches). That equates to 1000 shad.  It’s time to go save some shad and catch stripers in the process. Here is the plan.
Stripers hit the surface shortly after dawn and continue to feed randomly throughout the day. Slurps were seen this morning in Warm Creek, Gunsight mouth, Labyrinth Bay, Padre Bay east wall, Gregory Butte bay, West Canyon mouth, and Dove Canyon mouth. There was still a breeze blowing in Rock Creek so no striper slurps were seen there. I am sure the same events played out uplake.  If it was calm there were stripers slurping.
Surface feeding stripers stayed up longer and were likely to hit my lures better today than last week.  Today I could cast Lucky Craft (ghost) Pointers beyond the surface feeding school and work the lure through the closely feeding fish.  With a good cast and if the stripers continued to feed in the same direction, hookups came about half the time. The 4-inch lure is a lot bigger than the forage, so each striper has to give up small shad to feed on something really big like my lure.  Later in the day it occurred to me that these fish might be bold enough to hit topwater.  I tried an Ima Skimmer (white) and found them just as likely to hit the surface lure as the crankbait. I used topwater the rest of the day.
Schools varied in size from 10 fish to about 50. They fed in a semi-circular pattern more like adults cornering full grown shad. Lures that landed inside the group caused a few to splash but caused others to hit the lure. The school moved fast enough that only one cast could reach the group.  The trolling motor in high gear or the big motor at fast idle was needed to keep up with the rapidly moving school.
Most of the schools were found in the main channel over deep water. Spoons did not work as well over deep water as they do when the escaping school heads to the bottom and stops at 30-40 feet. No fish were caught on spoons today.  Stripers continued to slurp until 11 AM when wake boat traffic increased.  They will blow up any time they find food and calm seas. Expect to see slurps randomly throughout the day but more commonly early morning and late evening.
Adult stripers are still locked down below 20 feet by the warm surface water. Bait works but crayfish are coming out of hiding. Adult stripers can be caught trolling in the 10-30 foot strata. Storm deep Thundersticks are working quite well.
Bass fishing did not keep pace with stripers.  The rapidly rising water levels may be hindering bass catch rate.  Bass are staying in their preferred holding structure previously found and have not moved up even though the water level rose another 5 feet higher this week.  Water temperature also plummeted from 76 last week to 69 this morning. Bass did not bite as well today as they did last week, but I think they will recover as the water temperature warms up with the weather this week. Look in the same rocky habitat or flooded brush points to find willing smallmouth. Largemouth bass are tucked in tight in shallow weedy water. Expect bluegill and largemouth to be close and sharing the same habitat.
Now is the time to try Catfishing as these bottom dwellers are in spawning mode and are super active.
Two more tagged walleye were reported this week with both fish coming from the Cedar to Knowles canyon area of the main channel.  Both fish were tagged in Good Hope Bay but moved downstream for some reason.  We will continue to work on walleye movement and report when we have conclusive information.
My next move is to post this report and then go fishing for slurping stripers!

Lake Powell Fish Report – June 14, 2017

Lake Elevation: 3627.36

Water Temperature: 69 - 78 F

By: Wayne Gustaveson http://www.wayneswords.com

Stripers on Top!

In the last report I mentioned that stripers would soon feed on the surface. We now have confirmation!  Stripers are slurping lakewide.  The recent w**dy days kept stripers down as the waves crashed against the shore and messed up surface visibility where young shad swim.  This morning it was finally calm and stripers were on top early and baby shad were being consumed by the millions. The twenty stripers I caught this morning averaged about 50 shad per stomach (average length 0.75 inches). That equates to 1000 shad.  It’s time to go save some shad and catch stripers in the process. Here is the plan.

slurps622a

 

Stripers hit the surface shortly after dawn and continue to feed randomly throughout the day. Slurps were seen this morning in Warm Creek, Gunsight mouth, Labyrinth Bay, Padre Bay east wall, Gregory Butte bay, West Canyon mouth, and Dove Canyon mouth. There was still a breeze blowing in Rock Creek so no striper slurps were seen there. I am sure the same events played out uplake.  If it was calm there were stripers slurping. 

Surface feeding stripers stayed up longer and were likely to hit my lures better today than last week.  Today I could cast Lucky Craft (ghost) Pointers beyond the surface feeding school and work the lure through the closely feeding fish.  With a good cast and if the stripers continued to feed in the same direction, hookups came about half the time. The 4-inch lure is a lot bigger than the forage, so each striper has to give up small shad to feed on something really big like my lure. Later in the day it occurred to me that these fish might be bold enough to hit topwater.  I tried an Ima Skimmer (white) and found them just as likely to hit the surface lure as the crankbait. I used topwater the rest of the day. 

Schools varied in size from 10 fish to about 50. They fed in a semi-circular pattern more like adults cornering full grown shad. Lures that landed inside the group caused a few to splash but caused others to hit the lure. The school moved fast enough that only one cast could reach the group.  The trolling motor in high gear or the big motor at fast idle was needed to keep up with the rapidly moving school. 

Most of the schools were found in the main channel over deep water. Spoons did not work as well over deep water as they do when the escaping school heads to the bottom and stops at 30-40 feet. No fish were caught on spoons today. Stripers continued to slurp until 11 AM when wake boat traffic increased.  They will blow up any time they find food and calm seas. Expect to see slurps randomly throughout the day but more commonly early morning and late evening.

 Adult stripers are still locked down below 20 feet by the warm surface water. Bait works but crayfish are coming out of hiding and adult stripers are slurpdirectionsearching the flats along the shore for a good meal. Adult stripers can be caught trolling in the 10-30 foot strata. Storm deep Thundersticks are working quite well. 

Bass fishing did not keep pace with stripers.  The rapidly rising water levels may be hindering bass catch rate.  Bass are staying in their preferred holding structure previously found and have not moved up even though the water level rose another 5 feet higher this week.  Water temperature also plummeted from 76 last week to 69 this morning. Bass did not bite as well today as they did last week, but I think they will recover as the water temperature warms up with the weather this week. Look in the same rocky habitat or flooded brush points to find willing smallmouth. Largemouth bass are tucked in tight in shallow weedy water. Expect bluegill and largemouth to be close and sharing the same habitat. 

Now is the time to try Catfishing as these bottom dwellers are in spawning mode and are super active. Two more tagged walleye were reported this week with both fish coming from the Cedar to Knowles canyon area of the main channel. Both fish were tagged in Good Hope Bay but moved downstream for some reason.  We will continue to work on walleye movement and report when we have conclusive information. 

My next move is to post this report and then go fishing for slurping stripers!

catboy

Last Updated on Wednesday, 14 June 2017 09:43
 


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